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What is Long Form Narration?
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ccpetersen
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

100 pages?

wow.
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ConnieTerwilliger
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did a training piece for the Navy a few years ago - teaching young radio operators how to turn on their MUX radios. We did the 100 page script 3 times over the course of a year or so...
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patmccall
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2008 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Obi-Wan Fraley,

Parks, Theme Parks and Museums sometime have audio tours/explanations that could fall into this category.

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Pat McCall
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don G. wrote:
The bulk of what I do is long-form narration - corporate training type stuff. I can't remember ever having the luxury of getting the script ahead of time. We generally crank out these 100+ page scripts in a couple of hours. Invariably there are several instances during a session when about two-thirds of the way through a segment, it will dawn on me what they are trying to say. I used to always ask to re-do it "now that I know what they mean", but more often than not the engineer will request that we just plug away as "it sounded fine". It's a little frustrating as talent, but as they say, the checks clear, so...


I know this post is a little dated, but I just wanted to say I know exactly what you mean, Don. My job requires that I do some very long-form work with little or no prep time (see below), and it's always amazing when, on my third or fourth read of a sentence or paragraph, I'll *finally* get what the writer is trying to say, and then everything falls into place on read number five.

My job would also fall into the long-form category. I read legal opinions into mp3 format for law students. Some of them are as short as 300 words, and some go all the way up to 10,000. In most cases, rehearsal consists of little more than a quick read right before recording -- it's fortunate that our cases are edited after the fact, otherwise we'd be recording one opinion for days on end.
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Lizden
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 7:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does my 10 hour-24,000 word-127 page session count as long form? Shocked Wink

(and yes, I DID read it in advance & send email questions to the client...even though I only got the script the day before!)

Like I said...I LOVE MY JOB! Laugh

Liz
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Yoda117
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A few others to add to the list:

Legal dictations
Technical Reviews
Proposals
Technical specification documents (you'd be amazed... the one for tissue paper was 47 pages long)
Compliance modules

and let me affirm jasbart's statement that the talent's knowledge of the subject matter is a huge asset to narrations in certain fields. Having backgrounds that cover IT, medicine, and the law, I've done very well in this regard (particularly in regard to IT).
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bobbinbeamo
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My bread & butter is corporate, technical, training and medical narration. Most are fairly lengthy projects. Thankfully, I can actually sound like I know what I am talking about, even if I don't.

I am getting ready for a 35 page script, followed by a 90 pager to arrive tomorrow. As always, I will read the script, ask the client pronunciation questions, mark the script with places to breathe, do my warm ups after getting a good night's sleep, and then get comfy in the booth like I am geting ready to take a long drive.
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Yoda117
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ConnieTerwilliger wrote:
I did a training piece for the Navy a few years ago - teaching young radio operators how to turn on their MUX radios. We did the 100 page script 3 times over the course of a year or so...


You'd think that they'd take care of that during initial brief/OJT.

/I know, I know, I'm preaching to the choir.
//electrical safety ones are my favorite; the back stories on those are hilarious
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Don G.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 6:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've probably done more "fixes" for military and government stuff than for any other. It always amazes me that little things sneak past the eyes of the approval committee. My guess is that they don't read the script aloud after writing it out, and things that may have made some sense on paper don't quite make it when they actually hear it. And then there's the overuse of the parentheses....but we won't go there.

And yes, Liz, a 10 hour day in the studio is long form, although it might be right up there with waterboarding. Wink
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Yoda117
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don G. wrote:
I've probably done more "fixes" for military and government stuff than for any other. It always amazes me that little things sneak past the eyes of the approval committee. My guess is that they don't read the script aloud after writing it out, and things that may have made some sense on paper don't quite make it when they actually hear it. And then there's the overuse of the parentheses....but we won't go there.


I can validate that statement. More to the point, the people tasked with writing the documents, shouldn't be writing them for VO. And those who approve them for use rarely read them anyway.
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MBVOXX
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2008 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've done more "long form narrations" than I can possibly remember. Not once has a script ever been sent in advance of the session. It just doesn't work that way in the real world. If the recording is being done at a public access studio the client and studio expect the talent to know what to do with a long script and allow for a pre read and related questions at the session. For a producer/engineer, if you are working with a talent that has an established vocal style then that's generally what you want that talent to bring to the narration. For narrations done via ISDN with scripts coming in email then I usually do a pre read and call the client if I have any pronunciation questions. Yes, the scripts are longer than commercial length, but a professional voice talent will handle it with ease. For the talent, all scripts should be pre read prior to recording and the talent should make necessary notes for pauses, emphasis, etc...and more technical scripts do require more critical proofreading and perhaps some phonetic notes. It doesn't take long...a seasoned, experienced talent should be able to do a pre read and notation on a 30 page script in just a few minutes.
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